czaja-195x260

Sara J. Czaja, PhD

czaja-195x260Professor
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Industrial Engineering
Scientific Director of the Center on Aging at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Director of the Center on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement
University of Miami
MDOM- Psychiatry & Behavioral Science
1695 NW 9th Ave, Miami, FL 33136
Phone: 305-355-9068
Email: SCzaja@med.miami.edu
Visit Website

Sara J. Czaja is a Leonard M. Miller Professor of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and a Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Miami. She is also the Scientific Director of the Center on Aging at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the Director of the Center on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE).   CREATE is funded by the National Institute on Aging and involves collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology and Florida State University and is focused on older adults and their interactions with technology systems in work, healthcare, and everyday living domains.

Dr. Czaja has extensive experience in aging research and a long commitment to developing strategies to improve the quality of life for older adults. Her research interests include: aging and cognition, aging and healthcare informatics, caregiving, older workers, human-computer interaction, training, and functional assessment. She has received extensive funding from the National Institutes of Health as well as other federal agencies and foundations for her research. Dr. Czaja is very well published in the field of aging and has written numerous book chapters and scientific articles. She recently co-authored a book with other members of the CREATE team concerning the design of technology systems for older adult populations and a book on training older adults. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the Gerontological Society of America. In addition, she is the current president of Division 20 (Adult Development and Aging) of the American Psychological Association. She is also a member of the National Academy of Science/National Research Council Board on Human Systems Integration and is serving on an Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Healthy Cognitive Aging and an IOM Committee on Family Caregiving for Older Adults.

Save

perez-195x260

Miguel A. Perez-Pinzon, PhD

perez-195x260Professor of Neurology & Neuroscience
Vice-Chair for Basic Science (Neurology)
Director, Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Laboratories
Dept. of Neurology, D4-5
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
P.O. Box 016960
Miami, FL 33101
Phone: 305-243-7698
Email: perezpinzon@miami.edu
Visit Website

A major emphasis in our group is directed towards understanding the mechanisms of neuroprotection by ischemic preconditioning (IPC) against cerebral ischemia (as elicited by a stroke or cardiac arrest). We have demonstrated in brain that IPC is mediated by two key signaling pathways. One of these pathways is a protein kinase C isozyme epsilon. Another signaling pathway involves the NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylase SIRT1. Our laboratory is fully engaged in defining how these signaling pathways protect neurons against cell death. We are currently studying how these pathways alter synaptic plasticity and ameliorate mitochondrial function.

Another area of emphasis in our group is defining mechanisms by which some signaling pathways alter synaptic function following cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary arrest remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S.A. The chances of survival following cardiac arrest are poor, despite fast emergency responses and better techniques of defibrillation. Cardiac arrest with its consequent disruption of blood flow sets in motion a cascade of cellular derangements that result in brain damage.

A third area of emphasis in our group is the definition of the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia. It has been postulated that delayed cell death after brain ischemia may result from two different mechanisms: apoptosis and/or necrosis. In both pathways however, mitochondrial dysfunction appears to play a pivotal role. We are currently investigating the signaling pathways that lead to mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia.

Tatjana Rundek, MD, PhD, FANA

Professor of Neurology, Epidemiology and Public Health
Interim Scientific Director, Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute
Vice Chair, Clinical Research in Neurology
Director, Clinical Translational Research Division
Director, MS Degree Program in Clinical Translational Investigations
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
1120 NW 14th Street, Suite 1348
Miami, FL 33136
Phone: 305-243-7847
Email: trundek@med.miami.edu
Visit Website

Dr. Tatjana Rundek is a Professor of Neurology, Epidemiology and Public Health with tenure, Vice Chair of Clinical Research, and Director of the Clinical Translational Research Division in the Department of Neurology of the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. She holds a secondary faculty appointment at the Department of Neurology at Columbia University in New York. Dr. Rundek is a stroke neurologist, clinical researcher and principal investigator of several NIH/NINDS funded R01 grants on genetic determinants of carotid atherosclerosis and stroke. Dr. Rundek is a recipient of a NINDS K24 Midcareer development award. She participates in large stroke genetic consortia including the NINDS Stroke Genetic Network and International Stroke Genetic Consortium. Dr. Rundek was a Fulbright Scholar and the recipient of the research awards from the Hazel K. Goddess and the Dr. Gilbert Baum Funds. Dr. Rundek serves on the editorial boards of several scientific journals including Stroke, Neurology, Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine and Cerebrovascular Diseases. She has published over 210 scientific publications, editorials, reviews, and book chapters. She is a fellow of the American Neurological Association, a member of the American Heart Association and American Academy of Neurology. She is past President of the Neurosonology Communities of Practice of the American Institute in Ultrasound in Medicine, the largest professional medical ultrasound organization in the U.S. Dr. Rundek serves on the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) Vascular Testing Board of Directors, a national organization that accredits clinical echocardiography, nuclear/PET, MRI, CT and Dental laboratories and carotid stenting programs.

Save

Save

Save

Save

sun-195x260

Xiaoyan Sun, MD, PhD

sun-195x260Education Director
Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurology
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
1120 NW 14th Street,
Miami, FL 33136
Phone: 305-243-9414
Email: xsun@med.miami.edu

Dr. Sun started her medical career as a neurologist in China. She obtained her PhD in neuroscience in Japan. She completed her neurology residency training at the Medical University of South Carolina in the United States. She completed a cognitive and behavioral neurology fellowship at the VA Boston Healthcare System in the United States. Her research activities have been primarily focused on Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Her earlier work includes characterization of biochemical properties of tau protein in the axonal transport and roles of amyloid protein in Alzheimer’s disease. She is one of the earliest researchers to establish quantitative amyloid ELISA in the field. Her long-term efforts are dedicated to identifying the biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. She has been invited to be a reviewer for multiple journals on Alzheimer’s research. Currently, she provides clinical care to patients with cognitive disorders, develops and oversees educational programs for medical residents and is the Education Director for the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Miami.

Save

levin-195x260

Bonnie E. Levin, PhD

levin-195x260Bernard and Alexandria Schoninger Professor of Neurology
Director, Division of Neuropsychology
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
1120 NW 14th Street, Suite 1336
Miami, FL 33136
Phone: 305-243-7529
Email: blevin@med.miami.edu

Dr. Bonnie Levin is the Alexandria and Bernard Schoninger Professor of Neurology and Director of the Division of Neuropsychology in the Department of Neurology at the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. She received her BS from Georgetown University and her PhD from Temple University. She completed an internship at the Boston Children’s Hospital where she was a clinical fellow in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and an externship at the Boston VA Hospital.

Dr. Levin is a neuropsychologist whose research examines neurocognitive and affective changes associated with neurodegenerative disease and the normative aging process. Her work examines the role of cardiometabolic risk factors in cognitive decline. Another focus has been the inter-relationship between behavioral and motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and the neural circuitry underlying memory and age related cognitive change. Her current work is aimed to advance our understanding of frontal striatal circuit function in cognition and to generate data that will improve our knowledge of key clinical parameters associated with differential rates of cognitive decline. Current projects include: examining which components of the metabolic syndrome predict cognition, identifying imaging and clinical correlates of white matter changes associated with the aging process and linking structural and metabolic markers underlying different symptom profiles in neurodegenerative disease.